Sunday, April 10, 2016

Just not for me...........

Today I got the Gilmore Gem II loom warped up for some patriotic table runners. Theresa loaned me this loom so I could see if it was a loom I'd be interested in ordering for the beach cottage. Well, it's just not right for me. It's a quality made sturdy little loom but just doesn't work for me. I made myself a pros and cons list when I started today and the cons were overwhelming.  So, now I'm thinking of putting some money into fixing my 24" 8H Macomber that was 'dropped on it's head at birth'. I think I'm just a Macomber gal - I've had my 40" 10H Mac for 30 years - it had decades on it when I bought it and I will never give it up.

Yesterday was my guild hands-on program on bow weaving. I taught 30+ fellow guild members how to bow weave, most finished their beaded bracelets by the time the meeting was over, others well on their way to finishing. It was a bit overwhelming to teach that many but I had two friends, Linda and Margie, who kindly offered to be helpers - they were life savers. I think everyone enjoyed the process and had fun.

I'm done weaving for today, will pick it up again another day. So now I'm off to work on hemming a huge stack of towels while I watch the first episode of the new season of Outlander. I signed up for Starz on our satellite service just so I can watch this........and after I watch that I know I'll still have more towels to hem so I'll put on Thursday's dvr'd episode of The Vikings.........



9 comments:

  1. I hope I've not asked you this question before: what kind of loom do I need to look for? I'm in a wheelchair, so I do think I need a table top model. Also, I need a used one because of price. I don't want to make blankets or anything large, mainly scarves and table runners or dresser scarves, all for myself. I'm not interested in selling anything. I've looked at a few online sites and think a rigid heddle loom would be best? I really have no idea what specifications to look for. I wouldn't want to make anything wider than 24". I assume you can make items as long as you want. ? I certainly appreciate your advice and where to find used looms. I've seen very few. Thank you for any help you provide.

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    1. Hi Lesley Ann, you know, I'm not the weaver to ask about a rigid heddle loom but it may be the way to go with you being in a wheel chair. If you could reach the handles on a table loom easily I would tend to look for a used table loom instead. Only you would know your range of motion in reaching things placed on a table, which I'm sure you could make the correct height. And yes, you could weave items as long as you'd like to the limit of how much warp could be wound on the back beam.

      Do you have any weaving stores near you? Are you close to any place that has fiber festivals. If so I'd suggest you go check out what's available in the size of loom you're looking for to try them out.

      I highly recommend used looms, generally they are in good condition, at least the ones I've seen. A good place to start looking for them is if there's a local weaving guild in your area. I've heard of many groups on Ravelry just for selling weaving equipment so that's another option. I've only bought a few used looms and have always found them somewhat local.

      I hope this helps.

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    2. Thank you! Unfortunately, there are no fiber festivals in my part of West Virginia, nor are there any weaving stores, of which I'm aware. I have full range of motion, so I don't think that would be a problem. I'll begin my search online. Your projects are so lovely and inspirational. Again, thank you.

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  2. Well, trying before you buy is makes so much sense. It might help others looking for a small portable loom to actually have a full a review. You mentioned to me the way you have to thread since neither beam is removable and the shed size. And I'm all for refurbishing a loom you know you can love! :-)

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    1. I'm so grateful you insisted on bringing it over for me to work on. As I've said - it's a wonderfully made loom, it's just not the loom for me.

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  3. I would be interested in hearing about some of your cons. I, also, have a Macomber but I am finding it a real challenge. I think I have shrunk too much (!) and I am way too short and sitting on a bench gives no support.

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    1. I hesitated going in to details as I don't want anyone to think I'm bad mouthing this cute little loom. It's a quality made loom - it's just not the right fit for me.

      For me the deal breakers were that it hurt my back threading the heddles from the front of the loom - the beater is not removable, nor does the front fold down or come off. The treadles are very narrow, as they have to be for a small loom, they hurt my feet. Pressing forward on the treadles hurt and tired out my legs as compared to pressing straight down on my Macomber. And the shed is small. There are a few other small items but they wouldn't have been deal breakers for me.

      With that said it's a nice compact, sturdy, easily transported loom. It has a nice option shelf castle. The way the front apron winds around holds the finished cloth away from your knees - not an issue on my Macomber either but is on some other small looms.

      This is just not the loom for me - others love it. We all need to find what feels right for each of us. I'm sure there are many out there that don't love their Macombers like I do.

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  4. Thanks for your reply--I thread my loom in the same way and that's good for the Macomber--I take the beater off and fold down the front beam and sit inside on a kindergarten chair. That is a big issue!

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  5. You are so fortunate to have Theresa so close that she could loan you the Gem and that you could weave a full project on it instead of sampling it at another location. I only know one other Macomber owner and she like you swears it's the only loom for her. Thanks for the update on the Gem. I've wondered about it.

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I love your comments - thank you!